The month of May is National Bike Safety Month, are you prepared?

Posted by Brian Dekle

May 4, 2016 9:14:26 AM

Have you ever been out for a night ride and had a car pass by too close for comfort? Do you ride with a repair kit at the ready to handle any setbacks or quick adjustments on the go? Do you and your love ones, practice good habits when riding or sharing the road? Whether you’re a casual cruiser, the competitive cyclist, or a considerate motorist it’s always great to double check that you’re prepared and knowledgeable for any misadventures that the road or trail may throw at you. May is National Bike Safety Month, and I’d love to share some thoughts to keep you out and keep you safe.

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For an easy tip, here’s rule one… wear a helmet! I’ve seen this first-hand, wearing a helmet can save your life… no matter how slow you’re riding it’s only to your benefit. There’s a ton of options out there, so if you want a casual or a high performance life saver you’re going to be covered, literally. Here are a few great brands to consider: Nutcase, Bern, Smith, Giro, and Poc. The key to a great helmet is all about fit, as well as making sure it’s appropriate for the level of activity at hand. Be sure to pop into your local bike shop and try on several options to ensure you get the best fit possible.

Safety is a necessity in our lives, though the concept of the word doesn’t exactly inspire joy or fun I’ll admit.To explore that a little further, you may believe bike lights aren’t as necessary during the warmer seasons ahead. To some degree you’re right; however, you may be interested to learn that most cycling accidents occur during daylight, as well as low-light times such as sunrise or dusk. So how do you add safety and a little character to such a dry subject? Easy, you add LEDs. Thanks to LED lighting you can ride with a little extra personality. It’s always important to BE SEEN & BE SAFE… but you don’t need to be bland about it. For front & rear visibility I’d suggest a simple solution, like the TWISTLIT - LED BIKE LIGHT which is an easy “on-the-go” item. It’s a small, simple, and easily stowable form of visibility that can give you that extra bit of attention to others on the road. Another safety item with a bit more color for your night ride is the SPOKELIT - LED SPOKE LIGHT. The SpokeLit is a quick and easy install to your wheel spokes, and greatly increases your side to side visibility. There are a ton of color options as well. But that’s just the bike… what about keeping you seen? This is where one of my favorite Nite Ize products comes into the fold... the  SLAPLIT - LED SLAP WRAP.

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The SlapLit takes me back to my youth and the days of the Slap Bracelet. I mean come on, we all had them… and how do you make that better? Yep, you add LEDs. What was once a toy from my early days is illuminated to keep you visible in the dark, and it’s completely bike friendly as well. Most riders wear the SlapLit around the ankle for visibility and to keep your pant leg away from the chain. I personally prefer wearing it on my wrist, which enables me to use the light as a turn indicator to motorist that may not be able to see my arms clearly on dark roads.

There’s more to safety than visibility though, you also need to be prepared. It’s great to have a general knowledge of your bike and how to maintain it. A great resource for this is your local bike shop or REI as most will offer free courses in basic bike maintenance. These resources keep you connected with your local cycling community and are a great way to pick-up the skills to keep your bike in proper form should you get a flat or need to make some basic adjustments. Before every ride I suggest checking that your brakes are working properly, and that you have good tire pressure. To that effect, you should always be ready to tackle these issues when you ride. I highly recommend carrying:

  1. A new tube/patch kit
  2. A bike tool
  3. A tire lever
  4. An air pump/CO2 system


Having these items with you, as well as the knowledge to put them to use can be the difference between a ride and the dreaded “hike-a-bike” home. One of my favorite ways to keep your repair kit organized is to keep them together with our new BETTERBAND™ 5" ADJUSTABLE STRETCH BANDS. This is an easy way to secure your tools together, and keeps them easily stowable in a jersey pocket.

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So let’s do a quick recap: now you have a great fitting helmet, you’re ready to illuminate the day or night to be seen and safe, and you have some basic tools and bike knowledge to keep your rig rolling. That’s a great start, but be sure you know the rules of the road and how they keep you safe in your area. Here are a couple good resources to consider: bikeleague.org, safekids.org, as well as peopleforbikes.org. You may also be able to find some great programs in your neighborhood. Local to Colorado, I’ve had the great fortune of working with two programs that are reaching out to increase bike awareness and safety for children. Both are actively engaging youth communities to be safe, knowledgeable, and courteous riders. Our very own Boulder Valley School District is working with various age groups to develop good fundamentals early, as well as put these techniques to work on the road. It’s pretty inspiring to see a local education program coach student health and safety at such a priority. Another great program is tripsforkidsdenver.org which works with at-risk youth to foster life skills of personal empowerment. They focus on kids who have had no experience on a bike, while all the way creating achievement based programs in which these young participants can even earn a bike.

The important thing to remember on the road is to be safe, be courteous, and always remember to enjoy the ride. I can still remember when my Dad took the training wheels off my bike. For me it was a day of accomplishment and triumph… I found a new sense of exploration and freedom. For my family it was a sense of trust, a belief that they had instilled the proper knowledge and respect in their son to keep him alert, safe, and happy. I can say first-hand that this passion is still alive inside me today. I hope that you too have the same smile on your face during every ride.

Stay safe - Rubber side down,
Brian

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness, Visibility and Safety, Commuting, New Products

Preparing Your Car Emergency Kit for Winter

Posted by Katie Sowyrda

Nov 24, 2015 11:01:02 AM

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In the wise words of Game of Thrones - winter is coming. As I look out at a bluebird-Boulder day from my office, I know it’s only a matter of time before our first big snowstorm hits. Which reminds me, I still need to clean the gutters, replace my balding tires, and blow out the sprinkler system - oh, and update my car emergency kit which somehow always falls to the bottom of my list, even though I know it could be the most important item on there.
Having worked in the survival industry for five years and now at Nite Ize where I have access to myriad products which are specifically designed to perform in a pinch, and on top of that having a dad who always gives us “kids” Christmas presents like 2-way crank radios and “Avian flu emergency kits” (everyone’s dream gift - thanks, Dad!), I have no excuse for not having an up-to-date, comprehensive emergency kit in my car.  So, as I am getting ready for my annual kit update, I’d like to share some preferred kit items and other great resources to check out that I hope will help you to build or update your own car emergency kit.

What to get:

  1. A sturdy container

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    Once you have all your items, you’ll have a better idea of what size this should be, but make sure it’s something you can close like a rubber bin or sturdy nylon bag that zips shut. You can also use a good backpack in case you need to carry it, however it’s important to note that if you are stranded on the side of the road, it is NOT recommended that you leave your car. Your car is the best protection from the elements and where rescuers are most likely to find you - so, hunker down for the long haul. If you are in an accident on an icy road, you also should NOT leave your car, if an icy patch made your car spin out, it’s very likely that other cars will do the same, if possible move your car out of that trajectory.

  2. Flashlights

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    Most references tell you a flashlight - I may go a little overkill, but I have three flashlights. For my primary light I use the INOVA X3R LED Rechargeable Flashlight which I can recharge through my car’s USB port. I also keep an INOVA STS Headlamp in my bag in case I need to be hands-free for looking under the hood or under the car. Lastly, I have the Nite Ize 3-in-1 FlashStick, which can be used as a flashlight or lantern, but most importantly in an emergency it has a glowstick on one end which can be set to SOS mode to signal for help. In addition, I stock extra batteries for the two non-rechargeables.

  3. High-visibility Vest - In the case that I do need to get out of my car on a roadway, you better believe other motorists are going to see me. I keep a Nite Ize LED Run Vest in my bag which is neon yellow, has two bright red LEDs that glow and flash, and reflective accents. Paired with my 3-in-1 Flashstick, I feel confident that I will be seen and therefore safer on the side of the road.

  4. Chargers - If you have cell reception, your phone will be your lifeline, but it won’t do you any good if it has a dead battery. There are classic chargers to plug into your car or innovative external batteries and battery-integrated phone cases like the LifeProof FRĒ Power that can be life-savers in a pinch.

  5. Shovel and/or Kitty Litter - If you are stuck somewhere safely away from traffic, a shovel to dig yourself out and kitty litter or sand for traction can help you get moving again. If you don’t have either of these things, you can try wedging your floor mats under your tires to help them gain traction.

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  6. Blankets or Bivvies - Wool blankets are a classic staple for a reason - they are really warm. I keep two heavy wool blankets in my car - they’ve never been used in an emergency, but have come in handy for many a road-trip naps and as extra layers on camping trips. The one downfall of wool, is that if it gets wet, it’s miserable. That’s why I also keep two Escape emergency bivvies in my kit as well (so my husband and I don’t have to have that awkward conversation about who gets the bivvy to survive the night). These bivvies reflect 75% of body heat back to you, but are also breathable so you don’t get sweaty which is a pitfall of traditional mylar. In general I recommend staying away from mylar blankets and bivvies as they shred very easily and are flammable - it’s worth spending a couple bucks more to get a durable upgrade. Along the lines of warmth, I always make sure that I have a hat, gloves, and extra socks in my kit - even in the summer months here in Colorado it can drop below freezing at night, these don’t take up much space and are probably at the top of the list for most used items in my kit.

  7. Other Warming Items - I keep fire starting supplies in my kit (fire cubes and a sparker in case I need to start a fire outside my vehicle), one family in Nevada survived two days in sub-zero temperatures, building a fire inside their spare tire to help keep warm. Some people suggest using emergency candles as well for warmth and light inside the vehicle, though I’m noticing them mentioned less and less on recommended lists, probably due to safety concerns. If using one, you should crack your window to avoid possible asphyxiation, and ideally burn the candle inside a coffee can or tin because many parts of your car (and your kit) are flammable.

  8. First Aid Kit - This is essential, don’t bother with kits that are just chock-full of Band Aids, take your time researching kits and find one that meets your needs. If you have kids, there are family-focused ones that have kids’ dosages of meds and more often-needed items for them. As someone who does a lot of camping and fishing in the backwoods, I carry an Adventure Medical Kits Sportsman Kit which has comprehensive medical supplies in case of an emergency including QuikClot, and most importantly, the kit includes a book on how to use all the supplies in there in case I am far from medical care.

  9. Water - For drinking, for wound cleaning, for staying alive - I keep a gallon of human-water in an unopened jug, and then I also have a liter of water in a separate Olly Dog container/bowl combo for my pup since most often she is along for the ride too.

  10. Food - Food isn’t essential for short term survival (you can theoretically go for three weeks without it), however, eating does allow your body to produce more heat, and it can make a huge difference in your mood and attitude which will often determine how well you handle an emergency situation. I go for the classics like jerky and energy bars (peanut butter is a popular choice too), and then swap them out annually (or if you just plain get hungry and eat them then replace as needed). A good rule of thumb is to go for items with a long shelf-life that are high in protein, and that you actually like. If you have an ever-hungry dog like mine, make sure your food bag is securely enclosed in your kit, or they might just rip open your kit and gleefully eat all your jerky when you’re not looking.

  11. Car Essentials - Jumper cables, Fix-A-Flat, ice scraper, a siphon (hopefully you’ll find a friendly motorist who doesn’t mind sharing fuel), a tire iron, and jack are some basics that I keep because honestly, those are probably the only tools I would know how to use in a break-down situation. For those of you who are more handy with cars, the DMV has a helpful list that includes more suggested car repair items: http://www.dmv.org/how-to-guides/emergency-kit.php

  12. A Knife - You won’t find this on most lists, but my grandfather taught me that the most useful item you can have on you at any time is a knife, and throughout the years it’s a piece of advice that has served me well. And so, I am passing it on to you. One small one in your pocket or purse, and a utility one in your car kit - just trust me on this one, they come in handy!

  13. The add-ons - A few other items have accumulated in my kit over the years: Duct Tape (need I say more?), a hatchet which most often doubles as a hammer (this particular Gerber hatchet also has an integrated handsaw that slides out of the handle which is a nice bonus), a poncho, CamJam Tie Down Straps and Bungees, Gear Ties because they are just too useful not to have a handful, and lastly, a quality whistle for signaling in an emergency.

Pre-made kits and other helpful tips for safety on the roads:

There are pre-made kit options on the market as well, some are decent some are very cheap and not worth the money. Do your homework, and if you do go with a pre-made kit, remember that you will still need to personalize it to you - if you are frequently on the road with your spouse, kids, and a dog, you need to remember to add supplies for them. If anyone in your family has a serious medical issue always pack extra medication and supplies - you never know when a quick trip can turn into an overnight on the side of the road.

Other helpful resources:

    American Red Cross, Red Cross Recommends Preparing Your Vehicles for Winter:
http://www.redcross.org/news/article/pa/bethlehem/Red-Cross-Recommends-You-Prepare-Vehicle-Now-for-Winter-Weather

    The CDC, Be Prepared to Stay Safe and Healthy in Winter:
http://www.cdc.gov/features/winterweather/

    Chicago Tribune, Tips to Keep You Going When Your Car Stops:
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1989-01-03/news/8902220535_1_trunk-car-candle

 

That’s all I’ve got - I hope you found this useful, I hope you won’t need it, but I know you will be glad to have it if you do!

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness Month

Posted by Brenda Isaac

Sep 24, 2013 10:07:00 PM

Nite Ize Office Flooding

When we originally planned to start the Nite Ize Blog our first article was going to tie into Emergency Preparedness Month which falls each year in September. I wrote a very informative article about packing your "Go Bag" and having a family plan for unexpected emergencies, but at no point did I think I should actually implement this plan personally. It was for someone else. Some poor family in another part of the country that gets hit with strong hurricanes, someone who lives in the middle of the tinder dry mountains who might have to worry about a wildfire, or a family who lives near a fault line who may have to deal with an earthquake. That was last Wednesday. On Thursday my smug, non-emergency having world came crashing down around me.

As the rain gauge filled up for the 3rd time (over 15" of rain) in as many days, and the Colorado front range canyons and communities experienced what the news media have labeled "biblical flooding", it dawned on me that my family didn't have a plan. Not only didn't we have a plan, we were staring straight at an ocean of contaminated water, potential evacuation and road closures, loss of power/water/sewer, limited emergency services, and the words "self-rescue” hanging in the air. It was terrifying. With almost 12,000 people currently evacuated from their homes and thousands of helicopter rescues from mountain communities cut off due to washed out roads, I've heard dozens of stories from friends and strangers recounting the harrowing tales of escape and rescue. The one thing I keep hearing over and over again is "we had no time". No time to pack a "Go Bag", no time to gather important documents & medications, no time to lovingly pack cherished keepsakes, no time to do anything except leave with the clothes on their back and their lives. This is how emergencies happen, and sooner or later chances are that an emergency will happen to you. Basic family preparedness is something you owe yourself and your family.

The government has a great website that provides communication tips and a Family Emergency Plan document for you to fill out as a family. I highly recommend visiting their site: http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan to learn more.

You can also click here to see a list of items from Nite Ize that you could include in your "Go Bag". A helpful tip: Always choose a flashlight that uses L123 batteries. They have a 10 year shelf life and won't go bad and leak all over your flashlight if you don't use it very often. As I was clutching my INOVA T4R Rechargeable LED Flashlight in the dark last weekend, I was grateful for that piece of safety & security. A week later, my family has an emergency plan, a "Go Bag” and a sense of humility and gratitude having been spared the worst of the storm's damage. I know that next time we'll do better. Please, spend the time right now during Emergency Preparedness Month to make a plan for your family.

Emergencies can happen fast and without warning. Sooner or later, chances are that an emergency will happen to you. Basic family preparedness is something you owe yourself and your family. Our Emergency Preparedness Collection can help make your "Go Bag" even more useful in your time of need.

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Topics: Emergency Preparedness

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